Testimonials

Hein Wagner

International Keynote Speaker

“Braille – the bumpy grail!
Being blind since birth left me exposed to Braille produced by Pioneer Printers from the tender age of five years old. I never thought that Braille would play such a huge role in my life, however, 45 years later it remains my number one format to consume information.

Zac Yacoob​

Former judge of the Constitutional Court

I am a 74-year-old retired judge who has been blind from the age of sixteen months. I learnt to write braille on a slate and to read the few books that were available in the 1950s, courtesy of the RNIB and some American entities…..

Dr William Rowland

Imagine a world without reading and writing. That would be my world without braille. Braille was my medium of learning at school and was key to my physiotherapy studies in England and the earning of four university degrees, including a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Cape Town….

Dr Joan Wootton​

Music Theory Educator

As an educator of blind and partially sighted learners at the Pioneer School in Worcester Western Cape, I fell in love with Braille Music Notation once I discovered what a wonderful system it is for setting handicapped learners on an equal footing with the sighted…

Laylaa Shiyaam Jacobs

As a person who experiences the world differently, I use braille not only for reading and writing purposes but as a means of expressing myself. During my schooling years having my question papers printed in braille always brought about a feeling of familiarity. I felt less anxious….

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The NPO with a difference.

What makes us so unique?

Sole supplier of braille music to SA Braille Music Library.

First SA braille atlas.

Preferred braille workbook supplier.

Government contracted.

Producer of braille, audio, and large print NSC exam papers.

Preferred de-brailler.

De-brailling of NSC exam answer scripts.

Main producer of CAPS textbooks.

The main producer of braille, audio, and large print CAPS textbooks and setwork books in South Africa.

“Braille - the bumpy grail! Being blind since birth left me exposed to Braille produced by Pioneer Printers from the tender age of five years old. I never thought that Braille would play such a huge role in my life, however 45 years later it remains my number one format to consume information. From children story books to history and maths back at school, university studies and relaxing on an international flight with a book on my lap, Braille has been my go-to all along. As an international keynote speaker, the only thing that manages to calm me down in front of an audience is having my q-cards in Braille. I solute Pioneer Printers for their unwavering commitment to produce an array of content in top quality Braille to support the blind through school, university, the workplace and beyond”.
Hein Wagner
International Keynote Speaker
I am a 74-year-old retired judge who has been blind from the age of sixteen months. I learnt to write braille on a slate and to read the few books that were available in the 1950s, courtesy of the RNIB and some American entities. Although taped books were available from Tape aids for the Blind at the time, and I enjoyed very much listening to them, reading for me was fundamentally different from listening - as must be the case for all people who can see. The pleasure, quiet, intellectual and emotional satisfaction and the increased potential to internalise were irreplaceable advantages of braille and have remained so for me until today. In the early 1960s, we received school textbooks in English and Afrikaans produced by Pioneer’s predecessor, Worcester school for the Blind. During university and practice as an advocate, braille material was hardly available in the work situation. Braille printers became available in the 1990's which was a useful change. When I was a judge, I had a sophisticated braille printer available to me and I can say that it would have been impossible for me to do my work as a judge efficiently without it. I think my efficiency was increased two-fold. Finally, the introduction and development of the braille notetaker was an absolute boon. So, to conclude, I am certain that braille is essential to the reasonable development of many blind people”.
Zac Yacoob
Former judge of the Constitutional Court
Imagine a world without reading and writing. That would be my world without braille. Braille was my medium of learning at school and was key to my physiotherapy studies in England along with the earning of four university degrees, including a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Cape Town. At my workplace and in the home my computer with its braille display, my mechanical braille writer, and braille slate are essential tools always ready at hand. I enjoy reading books in braille and I receive up to six braille magazines per month, my favourites being National Geographic and Die Pionier, published by Pioneer Printers. I salute the team at Pioneer Printers as champions of braille in South Africa.
Dr William Rowland
Physiotherapist
THE BENEFITS OF BRAILLE MUSIC NOTATION
As an educator of blind and partially sighted learners at the Pioneer School in Worcester Western Cape, I fell in love with Braille Music Notation once I discovered what a wonderful system it is for setting handicapped learners on an equal footing with the sighted. Generally the blind learner has to learn to play by ear, which can be very time-consuming unless they are blessed with perfect pitch. Braille music enables the learner to practice independently, which improves self-esteem and also saves an inordinate amount of teaching time. Furthermore, the learner can learn the theory of music in Braille Music Notation, and will thereby be empowered to study music at a tertiary institution. They can then also learn to teach music to both blind and sighted people; they can perform and compete at international level and will also be able to compose music in any genre. I have been privileged to tutor a number of exceptional blind learners, using Braille Music Notation. They have succeeded in making music a career. Michelle Nel and Dewald van Deventer are two such examples. They have both become performers of note. Ying-Shan Tseng is currently working towards her Bachelor of Music degree and is in her second year at Stellenbosch University. She embraced the Braille Music Notation at school level and has reached unprecedented levels in her singing and piano playing. Carly Piater is another outstanding blind musician to note. Since mastering Braille Music Notation, her progress has been meteoric. She plans to study music at University and make it her career. Dr Joan Wootton
Dr Joan Wootton
Music Educator
As a person who experiences the world differently, I use braille not only for reading and writing purposes but as a means of expressing myself. During my schooling years, having my question papers printed in braille always brought about a feeling of familiarity. I felt less anxious. I might not have always understood the work but I understand braille. Which is something that no one can take away from me. However, once I matriculated my use of braille became scarce. Not because there was no material, but because not many people require me to write in braille. Braille is also a skill that can never be forgotten. As a now 20 year old, I still occasionally feel like a grade 1 girl learning braille for the first time. When I go to a restaurant or store and items have braille written on them, it gives me a sense of comfort knowing that I have a better understanding of my surroundings.
Laylaa Shiyaam Jacobs
Student

CONNECT WITH US

Address

4 Distillery Road
Worcester, 6850

Phone

+(27)23 342 6313

Email

info@pioneerprinters.org.za